French New Wave Changed Cinema – FilmmakingWithaCalculator!

The Techniques associated with French New Wave Filmmaking were improvisation, low cost equipment, shots which defied conventional tracking shot systems, i.e., handheld as well as the minimal setup time to achieve a film with an Improvised Feel.

From Wikipedia:

The New Wave (FrenchLa Nouvelle Vague) is a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s.

Although never a formally organized movement, the New Wave filmmakers were linked by their self-conscious rejection of the literary period pieces being made in France and written by novelists, their spirit of youthful iconoclasm, the desire to shoot more current social issues on location, and their intention of experimenting with the film form. “New Wave” is an example of European art cinema.[2] Many also engaged in their work with the social and political upheavals of the era, making their radical experiments with editing, visual style and narrative part of a general break with the conservative paradigm.

Using portable equipment and requiring little or no set up time, the New Wave way of filmmaking presented a documentary style. The films exhibited direct sounds on film stock that required less light. Filming techniques included fragmented, discontinuous editing, and long takes. The combination of objective realism, subjective realism, and authorial commentary created a narrative ambiguity in the sense that questions that arise in a film are not answered in the end.[3]

 

Influential names in the New Wave[edit]

Cahiers du cinéma directors[edit]

Left Bank directors[edit]